Explore

Whether your main challenge is scaling, speed, new growth or something else, we will help you discover how to innovate and execute better.

Design

Get productivity and innovation breakthroughs by designing work systems that exploit Lean principles to improve flow and learning.

Evolve

Outpace the competition by continuously and improving products and work systems while finding new opportunities to create value.

Lead

Inspire people with a learning-focused culture where managers help their people develop and contribute more than they thought possible.

Explore How Your Organization Can Be More Effective

Assess challenges and opportunities and discover how to address them using Lean, Design Thinking and Systems Thinking.

Common challenges:

  • Restructuring due to M&A or divestiture
  • Entering/leaving markets
  • Need to innovate faster
  • Reducing time to market
  • Changing business models
  • Desire to execute better
  • Growth obstacles
  • Customer satisfaction issues
  • Poor employee engagement and retention
  • Unhealthy organizational cultures
  • Leadership skills

Industries include:

  • IT Services
  • Enterprise Software
  • Online Media
  • Game Development
  • Aerospace & Defense
  • Web Development
  • Medical Devices
  • Process Control
  • Consumer Electronics

Process Overview

A collaborative process combines outside expertise with the knowledge and creativity of your own people.

  1. Select Exploration Team

  2. The exploration process requires joint participation and ownership. Depending on your situation, challenges and opportunities we will ask the client organization to appoint a small team to work with us. This team often includes the CEO.

  3. Discovery

  4. Our first step is to gather information from and with your team. We want to get a clear picture of where you have been, how things are going now, and where you are trying to get to. We will review information you send us as well as conduct interviews for more perspectives. We may speak with your employees, managers, customers, suppliers, partners and even board members as appropriate. We may also use an employee survey to assess your culture. Where external data is available we will work to compare you with other organizations so you know where you stand. Once we have finished gathering information, we will present a preliminary overview of the facts as we have been able to uncover them so far.

  5. Education

  6. Our process is collaborative and we want to transfer knowledge of the tools and methods we use to your team.  We spend a day to teach your team the basics of the Lean Systems Framework (LSF). The LSF extends traditional Lean with models and methods for modern knowledge work, systems thinking and design thinking. The knowledge transfer can be done on-site or remotely as a series of online sessions. We will use your own organization and your specific challenges as examples in the training.

  7. Develop Solution Scenarios

  8. In the final stage the process, we work with your team to develop possible scenarios for how your challenges can be met using various aspects of Lean, Systems Thinking and Design Thinking. The scenarios take into account your organization’s change capacity, but may also include steps you can take to increase your change capacity so you can evolve faster.

Changing business models, accelerating service delivery

Situation

Mobiletech, a fast-growing Scandinavian web development agency, had built a local client base as well as began an expansion into the US marketplace. The company specialized in helping its clients develop Mobile-friendly versions of their existing web sites. Over time the company had developed advanced tools to help automate this process, and it began an effort to move from a services-based to a product-based business model. Mobiletech’s leadership also wanted to improve the speed and profitability of its service delivery model.

Outcome

LSI provided a series of online educational seminars on Lean and Systems Thinking to Mobiletech’s leadership team, reviewed financial information and business plans, and interviewed leadership team members.  We jointly developed an approach for how to transition to a product-focused business model by redesigning the product and service delivery systems using Lean principles, followed by the use of Kaizen to continuously improve service delivery. The improved performance of the service delivery system could then be used to fuel the product development effort.

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Design Beautiful Organizations That Can Innovate, Execute and Grow Faster

Organizational Design Matters.

When too much complexity and too many
constraints make it hard to get work done.

When your people spend more time
juggling the ball than moving it forward.

Organizational Design is inescapable when you are…

Scaling

Organizations growing rapidly often face difficulty maintaining quality growth. Quality growth means ensuring adequate operating margins, qualifying new customers, retaining talented employees, protecting a healthy culture  and hiring high-performance employees. Growth coupled with an increase in complexity invariably leads to execution difficulties. The old structure and ways of working no longer function well, requiring Organizational Design expertise.

Innovating or executing too slowly

For mature organizations that need to move faster, teaching employees new methods won’t be enough. Internal and external barriers coupled with misalignment in goals and incentives will make it hard for them to implement what they have learned. Organizational Design helps remove barriers and yields a breakthrough in performance transparency.

Restructuring, divesting or merging

When organizations engage in significant structural change, they have no choice but to engage in Organizational Design, but the work is often done under time pressure and with great difficulty.  Organizational Design done properly, on the other hand, can prevent significant loss.

Process Overview

  1. Form a Working Group

  2. Organizational Design efforts are more likely to be successful when there are clear goals and constraints, an organized process and strong involvement from the affected parties.  The parties must also be aligned in their vision of success and scope.

    To to ensure a collaborative and inclusive process, the first step is to form a working group with 4-12 people depending on the scope of the effort.  The working group typically involves high-level executives in the areas affected and may also include the chief executive. For a larger redesign effort, one might form subsidiary working groups as well.

  3. Map the Current Organization

  4. When an Organizational Design effort is changing an existing organization, it is important to adequately understand how it functions. The working group uses models in the <a title=”Lean Systems Framework” href=”http://postlean.wpengine.com/lsf/”>Lean Systems Framework</a> to map workflows (value streams), information architecture, organization structure, physical workspaces, product families and organizational culture.  The working group uses these maps to ascertain what’s working well as well as to pinpoint and analyze problem areas.

  5. Design/Redesign

  6. Organizational Design often takes place under significant time and resource constraints and with a business that must continue operating. The design effort is organized as a series of workshops resulting in maps describing workflows, organization structure, information architecture, and so forth.  The design is driven by quantifiable objectives set by the working group.

  7. Implementation

  8. The design process culminates in a set of maps and a roadmap with an implementation plan. The working group proceeds to manage the implementation of this roadmap to ensure that their initial goals are being met.

European Media House facing overwhelming app development demand

Managing demand from multiple internal customers required a redesign of the development organization.

When everyone wants everything — yesterday 

Schibsted, a European media conglomerate, was transitioning from printed to online content, a complex process because the divergent app development needs of each of the media houses in its portfolio. The apps were developed on multiple platforms, including iOS, Android and web. Some were advertising-related, and therefore revenue sources impacting near-term financial performance. Others were editorial in nature, tied to major sporting events, elections, etc.  Stakeholders in the various media houses often found themselves competing for fixed app development resources. The lead time for app development requests was measured in months, often made worse by requirements and priorities changing significantly underway.

Engagement

The Schibsted Digital Media division engaged LSI to help it redesign its development organization.  A working group was assembled and trained to use the Lean Systems Framework’s Kaikaku method to map the existing development organization and then redesign it based on Lean principles.

Outcome

  • App development lead time reduced from months to weeks or days
  • Improved work-in-process transparency
  • Improved knowledge management due to consolidation of repositories
  • Greater awareness of cultural obstacles to further improving performance
  • Greater agility for accommodating last-minute changes
  • Successful knowledge transfer and implementation of Lean Development practices

Large defense program overwhelmed by complexity

The Future Combat Systems program was the largest and most ambitious program undertaken by the U.S. Army.

The working group looked at a large set of interrelated issues, seeking to simplify work and remove barriers to innovation.

Workflows were dramatically simplified, leading to a 76% reduction in lead time for new product releases.

From Compliance to Value Focus

Headquartered in Bethesda, MD, Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMCO) is the world’s largest defense contractor, employing about 140,000 people worldwide.  In 2005, Lockheed’s Information Systems & Global Services Division (IS & GS) was awarded a $100M+ subcontract as part of the Future Combat Systems (FCS) Initiative.  FCS was the largest defense program in modern history, an attempt by the U.S. Army to create new brigades equipped with new manned and unmanned vehicles linked by an unprecedented fast and flexible battlefield network and aided by various pieces of other gear.  IS & GS was responsible for the Level 1 Sensor Fusion (L1F) subsystem, which served to detect enemies and friendlies and placing them in space and time.

The L1F subprogram faced a complex set of circumstances.  It was one of thirty FCS subprograms managed by the master integrator, Boeing. While already ranked #1 for performance out of is peers, the L1F subprogram faced a complex set of circumstances. Boeing dictated the delivery plan as well as the rapidly changing requirements. Progress and resource consumption were managed using a rigid Earned Value management system. Architectural changes had to be coordinated with other subprograms as well.

Engineers and managers were required to use a CMMI-compliant development process. They inherited a set of process constraints that added a significant complexity burden.  They were also subject to frequent compliance audits from Lockheed corporate, the local quality organization, Boeing, and DoD.

The L1F Program Manager was concerned that long lead times and bureaucratic overhead for producing new software releases. L1F had to deliver multiple software builds, with each build taking approximately one year. The development value stream was a sequential progression from requirements to design, coding, integration and test. There was significant inventory buildup along the way, and rework loops adding to the total lead time for new requirements.

There was also a concern that everyone was so focused on complying with imposed process standards and passing audits that they were losing touch with the idea of innovating to deliver value to the customer. Group managers and staff felt they were not empowered to make positive changes without risking problems with process standards compliance, which would potentially affect L1F’s compliance rating with auditors and its top ranking as an FCS subcontractor.

The L1F subprogram also faced a severe knowledge management challenge. In addition to dealing with the complexity of all the required design documentation, they had difficulty selecting the right components for sensor fusion to reuse. No one really had a good overview of what components already existed and their respective capabilities.

Engagement

LSI initially helped L1F organize and evaluate existing software components that could be reused, resolving internal conflicts and misunderstandings. The result was a consensus on key architecture and technology decisions.

To reduce the long lead time for new releases, LSI taught courses in the Lean Systems Framework and facilitated a redesign of the L1F’s Product Development System.  The redesigned product development system utilized cross-functional teams using just-in-time (pull) based scheduling, collaborative spaces and significantly simplified processes.  For maximum agility, the teams were organized around product components instead of features.

LSI also helped L1F implement Kaizen for ongoing improvement and provided training in Lean Product Development, Kaizen and Kaikaku (organization redesign).  To ensure ongoing learning and development, LSI helped L1F begin a Community of Practice program, with “learning tracks” dedicated to Lean and other key topic areas.

Outcome

  • Estimated 76% reduction in lead time for new releases
  • Remained compliant with business process requirements imposed by several stakeholders
  • Reduced risk of delivery delays
  • Reduction in software defects
  • Faster diagnosis of defects detected
  • Greater agility for accommodating last-minute changes
  • Successful knowledge transfer and implementation of Lean Development practices

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Evolve Faster than the Competition with Kaizen

An essential aspect of Lean, Kaizen is about engaging all your employees to systematically make the organization smarter. Every day.

Most organizations utilize only a small percentage of their employees’ creativity and intellect. You can do better.

What parts of your business needs to evolve faster?

  • Business model(s)
  • Knowledge of customers
  • Knowledge of market trends
  • Hiring process
  • Sales process
  • Lead generation
  • Product development speed
  • Service delivery
  • Customer satisfaction
  • Partnerships
  • Employee engagement
  • Employee development
  • Knowledge management
  • IT systems

Identify your organizational learning and improvement needs, then pursue them systematically.

  1. Observe

  2. Organizational learning begins with observation. Everyone is encouraged to proactively look for problems, questions and opportunities as part of their work.

  3. Capture

  4. To ensure that valuable observations are not lost, they are captured and shared. This ensures a steady stream of ideas.

  5. Reflect

  6. On a regular basis, groups of employees and managers meet to discuss observations and decide what to do with them. Some observations will relate to organizational goals, and obstacles that must be overcome to achieve them.  Others will come from simply doing work.

  7. Resolve

  8. Resolving an opportunity means a project will be spawned, utilizing an appropriate problem-solving method.  The Lean Systems Framework supports a variety of methods:

  • A3 (Toyota’s classical method)
  • JDI (“just do it” – for trivial problems)
  • DX (Differential Diagnosis, suitable for complex problems)
  • QDEA (Question-Design-Experiment-Adapt, convert questions into testable hypotheses)
  • World Mapping (used for broad-discovery of facts, trends, etc.)
  • Kaikaku (Organization Design/Redesign)

Ensuring that Kaizen adds value

There will always be more observations and opportunities than capacity for pursuing them. Selecting the the right opportunities requires careful balancing between top-down and bottom-up perspectives,

The top-down perspective refers to organizational goals, or hierarchies of goals, and the obstacles that must be overcome to meet them. For example, if reducing the sales cycle or improving customer satisfaction are well-defined objectives, learning and improvement activities can focus on them.

The bottom-up perspective comes from day-to-day experience in doing work, whether in innovation or operations. Improvement ideas naturally occur to people as part of doing their work, and an effective Organizational Learning system must be able to capture them.

Changing Roles

Lean changes the day-to-day experience of employees and managers alike, and we provide coaching to help with this transition. Managers must set learning and improvement goals for their teams, not merely “doing goals”. Their focus shifts from directing work to facilitating learning and problem-solving.  Individual contributors also become involved with the business and with customer in a broader fashion. They are not only empowered to explore new horizons and make improvements, they are expected to do so.

Education

Kaizen for Leaders

This full-day course provides a detailed overview of how Kaizen works and what leaders must do to facilitate organizational learning.  We cover leadership behaviors, motivation, goal-setting and analytics – how to measure and understand the performance of your Organizational Learning System.

Kaizen for Practitioners (2 days)

In this hands-on course we cover the essential skills needed to organize and perform Kaizen activities.  Participations will work on real-life problems in their own organizations.  We cover all the problem-solving methods in the Lean Systems Framework except for the Kaikaku (Organization Design) method, which is covered in a separate course:

  • A3 (Toyota’s classical method)
  • JDI (“just do it” – for trivial problems that don’t require causal analysis)
  • DX (Differential Diagnosis, suitable for complex problems)
  • QDEA (Question-Design-Experiment-Adapt, converting questions into hypotheses and testing them)
  • World Mapping (used for broad-discovery of facts, trends, etc.)

Organizing Organizational Learning Activities

For Kaizen to work properly, the activities must be embedded in the work that people do, and they must be managed and tracked. Just like with a non-stop fitness program, sustainable results require tracking and feedback. We will help you organize the pipeline of observations, the decisions made about them, problem-solving projects as they progress and the results they generate. This can be done using an existing workflow management system in your organization or we can help you select an off-the-shelf solution.

Enterprise software company wanted to engage employees to improve execution and innovation

Smallworld’s software and services allows energy and telecom companies to track and manage their assets, optimizing asset functioning and financial performance.

Lots of ideas, no system for improvement

Smallworld Systems, a Norwegian enterprise software company, was challenged with increasing customer demand for software customization. Smallworld’s software helped telecom and energy companies manage their assets, but customers had slightly differing needs.  The company’s main challenge: improving customer responsiveness while continuing to ship new product releases.

Smallworld’s on-site consulting work was performed by members of the same engineering team that was working on new product releases. Smallworld struggled with a blend of priorities and business models, and prioritizing product features versus requests for customizations was also challenging.

As is often the case, Smallworld’s own employees already had ideas for what could be done to improve the situation. What the company lacked, however, was a system for identifying, selecting and solving problems.

Engagement

LSI provided leadership coaching as well as employee and manager education on Lean organization design principles and Kaizen. Smallworld organized regular sessions for Hansei (reflection), and LSI provided advice for how to organize improvement ideas and projects.  The training was initially delivered on-site to all employees and LSI also provided follow-up sessions as webinars.

To facilitate real-time transparency and efficient workflow, LSI helped Smallworld map its value streams and set up Kanban boards for each of them. This provided a baseline for continuous improvement efforts.

Outcomes

  • Successful knowledge transfer of basic Lean practices
  • Real-time transparent operations
  • Faster development
  • Improved customization responsiveness
  • Improved customer satisfaction
  • Employees become involved with strategy and business model questions

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Lead by Helping Your People Grow

If your people are not fired up, you are not leading.

Studies show that the majority of employees are not engaged in their jobs.

India 58%
North America 60%
Australia and NZ 63%
South America 63%
GCC 66%
Europe 69%
China 78%

Leadership is the process of inducing others to pursue a common goal or vision.  What makes it so difficult?

Common Challenges

Uninspiring vision

A key responsibility of leaders is to formulate a future that looks like it will be worth creating. No matter how sensible and realistic the vision, if it does not resonate with your employees it will be hard to make it exciting.

Poor communication

Leaders may secretly have a fantastic vision of the future, but they may fail to convey it people in the organization. There is much emphasis on impressing the outside world with storytelling, but if you cannot clearly convey a message to your own people, you have a more fundamental problem.

Employee-vision mismatch

Even if the vision is exciting, realistic and well communicated, it will be difficult to persuade people who don’t have personal values and interests that are compatible with the vision.  In such cases, people often leave the organization voluntarily, but if they don’t, they should be encouraged to leave.

Failing to engage people

Research shows that there are three major factors that must be addressed in order to effectively motivate employees:

  • Purpose – a sense that one’s efforts has a bigger-picture impact
  • Autonomy – being able to use their own minds to solve problems, without being micromanaged
  • Learning – professional growth

Even in organizations that provide a clear vision and a clear link between action and contribution, autonomy and learning are often neglected.

Leadership Styles

There are a variety of “styles” of leadership, each employing different approaches to defining a vision and inducing others to pursue it.  Here are some of the most common.

Command-and-control

This style, often associated with the military, emphasizes a strict chain of command with hierarchies of goals and limited autonomy. Professional growth may or may not be part of the equation, depending on the goals of the organization.  Military organizations often do better with professional growth then civilization organizations, since most of their time is spent practicing instead of fighting actual wars.  It is also worth mentioning that autonomy varies quite a bit and in some situations can be substantial.

Servant Leadership

The basic premise for servant leadership is that the leader is there to serve his or her people. In formulating a vision, the leader seeks participation and approval from them and the main approach to pursuing the vision lies in removing obstacles and helping followers be successful.

Charismatic Leadership

The business literature and the press is full of stories of celebrity CEOs who can move followers through their own force of personality, intellect and credibility.  Steve Jobs is a classic example.  He was admired, respected and perhaps feared somewhat, by his people.

The Quiet Leader

There are plenty of examples of leaders who don’t have an outsized personality and who are still effective in meeting organizational goals and motivating their people. Some even make a point of not having their “ego” get in the way.  This approach is known as “Quiet Leadership”.

Participative Leadership

In this leadership style, there is an emphasis on involving followers both in vision formulation and in decisions-making in general. The leader grants a fair amount of autonomy and seeks to reach decisions through consensus where possible.

Transactional Leadership

When an organization is not changing much and where the focus of action is invariably short-term, leaders tend to focus on day-to-day tasks almost exclusively.  A fast food restaurant would be a good example, but we also see this leadership style in organizations where sections are relatively isolated and change slowly.

Transformational Leadership

Transformational leadership is employed by leaders who seek to create value by transforming the organization and quite often themselves and their own people in the process. The style places great emphasis on autonomy and continuous learning for everyone.

Situational Leadership

This school of thought holds that leaders should not tied to a single style, but instead try to acquire a portfolio of leadership skills and then change styles as the situation changes.

Key Attributes of Leadership Styles

The leadership styles described here are only approximate; in practice leaders do behave differently under different circumstances.  The styles denote the default or dominant behavior, however.

A leadership style can be reduced to a few key distinguishing characteristics:

  • Knowledge rights – how much information is shared with followers
  • Decision rights – how much decision-making authority is delegated
  • Inclusiveness – emphasis on evolving followers
  • Emphasis on organizational change
  • Emphasis on personal development
  • Expectation of the leader as having the best answers
  • Consistency of the above

Because the two key activities of leadership are goal-setting and inducing others to pursue goals, it makes sense to look at these attributes for both.

Lean Leadership

The illustration above provides a visual profile of what Lean Leadership looks like.

Lean Leadership is a blend of the Transformational and Participatory leadership styles.  Aside from organizational development and the leader as a facilitator of the individual growth of his/her followers, Lean Leadership emphasizes a significant of knowledge and decision-rights, although leaders are responsible for the final decisions being made.  It is consistent (and not Situational) in that it does not deviate from these principles.

Lean Leadership is not Servant Leadership, in that it does not abdicate the responsibility of making decisions that may sometimes be unpopular. The fostering of the individual growth of the followers is not altruistic in nature, it is a practical approach to reaching challenging organizational goal through learning and problem-solving.  Developing employees is part of this, and it is also a key aspect in delivering value to and earning the long-range loyalty of employees.

While Lean Leadership does not reject strong personalities, the main emphasis is always on facts and problems.  It does not reject earning credibility through good decisions and demonstrated ability, however.

Leadership Coaching: Developing Skills and Behaviors

Our leadership coaching process uses a continuous improvement method analogous to what you would use to improve organizational performance.  The purpose of the process is to build leadership competencies and transition behaviors to adopt a Lean Leadership style.

In each session we reflect on what the participant has observed since the last time, and review goals in order to identify obstacles and problems. We work with the participant to develop potential solutions, which are then enacted   and reviewed in the next session.

Lean Leadership Education

We offer a two-day course on Lean Leadership that can be delivered in smaller increments as appropriate.  The course is an interactive mix of case studies, presentation, exercises and role-playing. Participants will be given pre-work and homework focused on real-world challenges they face in their organizations.

Topics covered include:

  • The purpose and key competencies of leadership
  • Leadership styles and what makes Lean Leadership different
  • Visioning and goal-setting – what makes a compelling destination?
  • Facilitating goal-setting and visioning
  • Evaluating your Leadership Capital (credibility)
  • Why should they follow?  Strategies for Motivation and Persuasion
  • Investing and Building Leadership Capital
  • Conflict Resolution
  • Coaching Followers
  • Coaching Yourself

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Lean Training and Coaching for Knowledge-Intensive Organizations

Lean Leadership (2 days)

Lean Leadership is a style of leadership that emphasizes organizational transformation as well as individual growth and development. This course is an interactive mix of case studies, presentation, exercises and role-playing. Participants will be given pre-work and homework focused on real-world challenges they face in their organizations.

Topics covered include:

  • The purpose and key competencies of leadership
  • Leadership styles and what makes Lean Leadership different
  • Visioning and goal-setting – what makes a compelling destination?
  • Facilitating goal-setting and visioning
  • Evaluating your Leadership Capital (credibility)
  • Why should they follow?  Strategies for Motivation and Persuasion
  • Investing and Building Leadership Capital
  • Conflict Resolution
  • Coaching Followers
  • Coaching Yourself

Coaching Process

Lean Leadership competency is best developed through practice and feedback. Our coaching process uses a continuous improvement method analogous to what you would use to improve organizational performance.  The purpose of the process is to build leadership competencies and transition behaviors to adopt a Lean Leadership style.

In each session we reflect on what the participant has observed since the last time, and review goals in order to identify obstacles and problems. We work with the participant to develop potential solutions, which are then enacted   and reviewed in the next session.

Kaizen for Leaders (1 day)

This course provides a detailed overview of how Kaizen works and what leaders must do to facilitate organizational learning.  We cover leadership behaviors, motivation, goal-setting and analytics – how to measure and understand the performance of your Organizational Learning System.

Kaizen for Practitioners (2 days)

In this hands-on course we cover the essential skills needed to organize and perform Kaizen activities.  Participations will work on real-life problems in their own organizations.  We cover all the problem-solving methods in the Lean Systems Framework except for the Kaikaku (Organization Design) method, which is covered in a separate course:

  • A3 (Toyota’s classical method)
  • JDI (“just do it” – for trivial problems that don’t require causal analysis)
  • DX (Differential Diagnosis, suitable for complex problems)
  • QDEA (Question-Design-Experiment-Adapt, converting questions into hypotheses and testing them)
  • World Mapping (used for broad-discovery of facts, trends, etc.)

Kaikaku – Organization Design (2 days)

This course introduces the Lean Systems Framework’s Kaikaku method, which is used to design and redesign organizations. Kaikaku is appropriate when incremental performance improvements are inadequate or when an organization has to restructure due to M&A integration, divestitures or rapid scaling or downsizing.

Topics covered include:

  • Composing a change team
  • Facilitator and participant preparation
  • Setting goals for an organizational design effort
  • Overview of the Lean Systems Framework models
  • Organizations and ecosystems as systems of systems
  • Mapping existing organizations in five dimensions
    • Value Stream Architecture
    • Information Architecture
    • Organization Architecture
    • Product Architecture
    • Social Architecture
  • Assessing organizational performance
    • Flow impediments and their causes
    • Uncovering conflicts and misalignments
    • The view of the customer
    • Strategic direction
    • Culture
  • Designing and specifying organizations
    • Design trade-offs
    • Implementation risks
    • Describing design solutions in five dimensions
  • Rapid implementation planning and execution
  • Soliciting feedback and help outside the change team
  • Presenting the new organization design
  • Transitioning to Kaizen for ongoing improvement

Lean Product Development (2 days)

This course shows how a Lean Product Development System functions and covers key practices for rapidly developing products that deliver verifiable and quantifiable customer value.  Organizations employing these practices are routinely able to cut their time-to-market by 50-70%.

Topics covered include:

  • Developing a product vision
  • Setting quantifiable product goals – Design Targets
  • Concurrent Set-Based Engineering – developing competing solutions
  • Component Reuse
  • Knowledge Management and Information Architecture in Lean Product Development
  • Designing and running experiments to validate customer value
  • Reframing testing from defect focus to generating information for decision-making
  • Scaling Lean Product Development with multiple teams, locations and organizations
  • Integrating Design Thinking in Lean Product Development

 

 

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